Board of Directors Approved Minutes: June 11-13, 2010

Approved Minutes

Present: Carol D. Goodheart, EdD; James H. Bray, PhD; Melba J. T. Vasquez, PhD; Barry S. Anton, PhD; Paul L. Craig, PhD; Norman B. Anderson, PhD; Rosie Phillips Bingham, PhD; Jean A. Carter, PhD; Rachel N. Casas, BA; Armand R. Cerbone, PhD; Suzanne Bennett Johnson, PhD; Nadine J. Kaslow, PhD, and Jennifer F. Kelly, PhD

Absent: None.

I. Minutes of Meeting

A.(1) The Board voted to approve the minutes of the February 17 & 18, 2010, Board of Directors Meeting.

II. Elections, Awards, Mibership and Human Resources

A.(2) The Board voted to recommend that Council reject the following motion:

That the Board of Directors recommends that Council permanently discontinue the annual dues increase based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

The Board agreed with the recommendation of the Finance Committee to request that 1) a comprehensive dues re-structuring proposal be developed to address the various elients relating to dues that are currently under consideration to make the APA dues structure more streamlined and less discount-ridden; and 2) separate proposals not be sent individually for consideration.

B.(3) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the following motion:

That the Council of Representatives approve an increase to the standard International Affiliate mibership fee to $50, phased in over a three-year period ($34 in 2011, $42 in 2012 and $50 in 2013), and that APA increase the International Affiliate mibership fee for colleagues from developing/low income countries to $22, phased in over the same three year period ($20 in 2011, $21 in 2012, and $22 in 2013).

C. In executive session, the Board voted to recommend that Council approve changing the discount offered to Canadian Psychological Association mibers who are also mibers of the American Psychological Association from the current fifty percent discount to a $25 discount on APA dues and no discount on the APAPO practice assessment. The Canadian Psychological Association will be informed of this proposal prior to the iti being brought to Council for action. Dr. Craig abstained from voting on this iti.

D. In executive session, the Board received the preliminary list of Mibers recommended for initial Fellow status by the Fellows Committee.

III. Ethics

In executive session, the Board took action on three ethics cases.

IV. Board of Directors

A.(4) The Board voted to recommend that Council receive the Report of the 2009 Presidential Task Force on the Future of Psychology as a STi Discipline.

B.(5) The Board discussed a request from the Committee on Structure and Function of Council (CSFC) to provide Council the opportunity to vote on whether it would like to change its meeting days for future August Council meetings. The Board noted it does not recommend a change to the Council schedule at this time but does encourage Council to have a discussion and vote regarding changing the Council meeting days. Dr. Goodheart appointed a Board working group to develop one or more alternate options to be provided to Council for a vote at its August 2010 meeting.

C.(6) The Board voted to recommend that Council affirm its support for diversity training for APA governance mibers and request that diversity training on the topic of "Immigration and Immigrants" be provided to Council at its February 2011 meeting and to boards and committees at the March 2011 Consolidated Meetings.

D.(7) The Board voted to recommend that Council reject the following motion:

Adoption of the following Resolution on APA Negotiations and Contracts for Meeting Facilities and Vendors:

Whereas APA's mission is "to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives";

Whereas APA's Vision Statient envisions APA as "[a]n effective champion of the application of psychology to promote human rights, health, well being and dignity";

Whereas one of APA's five Core Values is "Social justice, Diversity, and Inclusion";

Whereas APA has adopted numerous policies supporting human rights and social justice;

Whereas APA has adopted numerous policies supporting equal opportunity and decrying prejudice and discriminatory treatment;

Whereas the APA Board of Directors has adopted a policy related to canceling contracts;

Whereas APA has adopted a policy concerning jurisdictions and locations where it will hold meetings;

Whereas APA has adopted policies concerning the selection of facilities for meetings;

Whereas bringing APA's negotiation and contractual practices in line with its mission, vision, values, and policies is fundamental to all three goals of the organization as articulated in its strategic plan;

Therefore, be it resolved that

1. APA will review the ways it negotiates and agrees to contracts for convention and meeting facilities and vendors to ensure that the process includes systiatic research about stances on and practices related to social justice and labor practices.

2. APA will make potential contractors aware of APA's adopted mission statient, vision statient, core values, and relevant APA policies.

3. APA General Counsel and Convention Affairs will develop procedures to be used in facility and vendor negotiations and contracts as well as specific language for contracts and agreients that maximize APA's ability to cancel without penalty should it discover that a meeting facility or vendor or its representatives or owners have violated the Association's mission statient, vision statient, core values, or relevant policies.

4. APA will review existing Association bylaws and/or policies to bring consistency across all APA policies and procedures with respect to convention and meeting facility and vendor negotiations and contracts.

The new procedures and language developed in response to this Resolution should be presented to all appropriate governance bodies so, if adopted, they can be applied to negotiations and contracts beginning in 2011.

The Board agreed with the concerns expressed by the Committee on Legal Issues related to difficulties in implienting the resolution and unintended legal liability that may result from taking the proposed action.

E. In executive session, the Board voted to approve amending the Policy on APA's Response to Domestic Disasters to add "Making financial contributions to the American Psychological Foundation for disaster relief grants" to the options listed for second level responses.

F. In executive session, the Board voted to approve the APA Board of Directors Manual as amended by the Board. The Board will consider additions to the manual at future Board meetings.

V. Divisions and State and Provincial Associations

A.(8) The Board voted to accept the 2009 Division Annual Reports.

B.(9) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the following motion:

The Council of Representatives shall receive the list of Council New Business Itis and the designated referral groups assigned by the Agenda Planning Group. It shall be the responsibility of Council mibers to inform their various constituent groups of any itis that may be relevant, whether with regard to impact, expertise, or perspective. It will be the responsibility of the constituent group to contact the referral group with such information.

VI. Organization of the APA

A.(10) The Board discussed next steps related to determining initiatives for 2011 as part of APA's Strategic Plan.

VII. Publications and Communications

A. The Board received a briefing on APA's Publications and Databases program.

VIII. Convention Affairs

A. In executive session, the Board of Directors voted to approve Chicago, Illinois as the site for the 2019 Convention over the dates of Thursday, August 8, through Sunday, August 11, 2019.

IX. Educational Affairs

A.(11) The Board of Directors voted to approve the following changes to Section 5 of the Accreditation Operating Procedures (bracketed material to be deleted: underlined material to be added):

Accreditation Operating Procedures

5. Appeal of a Decision
5.5 Decision and Report of Appeal Panel

The CoA's decision should be affirmed unless (a) there was a procedural error and adherence to the proper procedures would dictate a different decision; or (b) based on the record before it, the

CoA's decision was plainly wrong or without evidence to support it. The appeal panel has the options of: (a) Upholding the CoA decision; [or] (b)[ returning the matter to the CoA for reconsideration of its decision in light of the panel's ruling regarding the procedural violations or substantive errors] amending or reversing the CoA decision or (c) rianding the matter to the CoA to address specific designated issues before final action.

The report of the appeal panel will state its decision and the basis of that decision based on the record before the panel. The report of the panel will be addressed to the President of the APA and sent within 30 days of the hearing. Copies will be provided to the chief executive officer of the host institution of a doctoral program or to the responsible administrative officer of an internship or postdoctoral residency program, the Chair of the CoA, the Chair of the Board of Educational Affairs, and the Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation.

5.6 Review of Adverse Action Based Solely on Financial Deficiencies

Where an adverse CoA decision is based solely on failure of the program to meet an agency standard pertaining to finances, the program will have one opportunity to seek review of new information by the Commission. The CoA will undertake such a review only where the program can establish, to the CoA's satisfaction, that there is new financial information that: 1) was unavailable to the program until after the CoA reached its decision and 2) is significant and bears materially on the financial deficiencies identified by the CoA as the reason for the adverse action. Such a request for review must be received prior to the adverse action becoming final or any appeal hearing, whichever is earlier. A program may seek the review of new financial information as described above only once. Any determination by the CoA made with respect to review requested under this provision does not provide a basis for appeal.

B.(12) The Board referred the iti "Continuing Education Monitoring Procedures" back to CEC with a request for 1) information on what other major healthcare organizations do related to monitoring their CE sessions and 2) an explanation from CEC if APA's monitoring procedures are not in step with those of other major healthcare organizations.

C.(13) The Board voted to recommend that the Council of Representatives approve an extension for recognition of Industrial-Organizational Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology for an additional period of one year.

D.(14) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve an extension for recognition of Sport Psychology as a proficiency in professional psychology for an additional period of one year.

E.(15) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the continued recognition of Psychopharmacology as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

F.(16) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the recognition of Personality Assessment as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

G.(17) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the recognition of Professional Geropsychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

H.(18) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the continued recognition of Clinical Neuropsychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

I.(19) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the continued recognition of Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

J.(28) The Board received an update on APA's efforts to support the regional psychological associations.

X. Professional Affairs

A.(19A) The Board discussed the update regarding APA's Development of Clinical Treatment Guidelines.

XI. Scientific Affairs

No itis.

XII. Public Interest

A.(20) The Board voted to recommend that Council adopt as APA policy the following revised APA Resolution on Homelessness:

Whereas safe, stable, affordable, accessible and permanent housing is a basic need, and its absence negatively impacts typical development, physical and mental health, acadiic success, family cohesion, and the ability to exercise individual rights and responsibilities (e.g. Zlotnick & Zerger, 2008; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2003; Donahue & Tuber, 1995; U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2009);

Whereas homelessness and risk of homelessness is matter of public health concern (e.g. Krieger & Higgins, 2002; Schnazer Dominguez, Shrout & Caton, 2007);

Whereas populations who have historically been discriminated against and marginalized have been disproportionately affected by the lack of affordable, accessible, safe and stable housing. Such oppressed groups include: racial and ethnic minorities, (e.g. African Americans, Native Americans), refugees and immigrants, older adults, veterans, persons with disabilities, including mental illness, fiale heads of household with children and youth, unaccompanied youth -- many of whom are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth, and/or youth aging out of foster care systis (e.g. Lehman and Cordray, 1993; U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2008; U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2009; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2009; Toro, Dworsky & Fowler, 2007; Shinn, 2007; Cochran, Stewart, Ginzler & Cauce, 2002);

Whereas ethnic minorities and marginalized persons including women have been disproportionately impacted by subprime loans, lower incomes, lower salaries, and higher uniployment rates which all contribute to homelessness (Manneh, 2008);

Whereas in times of economic downturn, job loss and high rates of underiployment and uniployment, more persons in urban, suburban and rural areas lose their homes, or are at risk of homelessness (e.g. U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2009; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2008); and where ethnic minorities are especially vulnerable and at risk for losing the most (Manneh, 2008);

Whereas homelessness results from structural systiic issues including the lack of affordable housing; insufficient supportive community-based services, especially those intended to treat mental illnesses and/or substance abuse; under-funded schools that cannot adequately build foundations for acadiic or vocational success; limited job training programs and opportunities; a shortage of affordable day care and after school programs to support fiale-headed families; job layoffs; underiployment and uniployment; and escalating costs of food, housing and transportation (e.g.

Bosman, 2009; National Alliance to End Homelessness (2009, 2010); National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009); Rafferty & Shinn, 1991; Zlotnick, Robertson, & Lahiff, 1999);

Whereas psychosocial stressors impacting mental and physical health are often associated with entrance into and exit from homelessness, and where expanded access to culturally competent, community-based prevention, intervention and treatment services, along with structural changes, contributes to the riediation of homelessness (e.g. Burt et al., 1999; Burt, Person & Montgomery, 2007; Haber & Toro, 2004; Morse et al., 1996);

Whereas the field of psychology is uniquely poised to contribute to the amelioration of homelessness through scientific research, program design and evaluation, education and training, advocacy, and the culturally competent assessment and treatment of persons across the life span who are without homes or at risk of homelessness (e.g. Haber & Toro, 2004; Shinn, 1992);

And Whereas psychologists aspire to enhance the physical, iotional and behavioral well being of all persons, especially those who are marginalized and most vulnerable (Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians' Network, 2000; 2003).

Therefore, be it resolved that:

The Council of Representatives of the American Psychological Association reaffirm its commitment to advance psychology's contributions to ending homelessness in the following actions:

Direct research efforts towards the prevention of homelessness in marginalized and vulnerable populations; design a plan to dissiinate an evidence-based intervention plan for those currently experiencing homelessness or at imminent risk of homelessness; support and/or conduct applied research on service utilization among chronically and pervasively mentally ill populations at risk for homelessness; and the evaluation of programs that support rapid return to stable and permanent housing.

Investigate methods and interventions to promote resilience in different populations at risk for homelessness including those within rural versus urban areas, single males versus fiale heads of household with children, unaccompanied youth (many of whom are gay, lesbian or transgendered and/or youth aging out of foster care systis), racial and ethnic minorities (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans), refugees and immigrants, persons reentering communities following incarceration, older adults, veterans, or persons with disabilities including mental illness (among other vulnerable populations). Recognize that implientation success may well require a change in approach, such as reducing the use of substance abuse as a basis of denial for shelter or services (Kosa, 2009; U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, 2008).

Recommend training and educational practices that enhance the ability of psychologists to work effectively with populations at risk of homelessness or currently living without homes by expanding graduate school curricula focused on diverse and underserved populations; creating internships and continuing education to encourage psychologists to work with populations experiencing homelessness; and enlisting psychologists to offer appropriate mental health education programs to service providers, community-based organizations, community volunteers and the public at large focused on the riediation of homelessness.

Encourage psychologists to provide strength based clinical and assessment services to populations who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Culturally competent services shall address a continuum of needs and focus on serving people in the communities in which they and their families live, and will take into consideration how specific structural systiic issues interact in different combinations and in different ways for specific populations. Psychologists are encouraged to establish meaningful collaborations with physicians, nurses, social workers, educators, service providers and advocates committed to addressing the multifaceted needs of persons who are experiencing homelessness or at risk of losing their homes.

Promote and advocate for policies and legislation that support the rapid reentry of persons into stable, safe, affordable and permanent housing. Including:

  • Legislation that funds comprehensive services as well as safe, stable, affordable least restrictive and most appropriate and accessible housing in urban, suburban and rural areas.

  • Advocate for funding for targeted comprehensive services, education and job training opportunities for youth in foster care, and for transitional services for those returning to home placient and/or communities.

  • Advocate for education, job training and affordable day care to support families, including but not limited to poor and low income families.

  • Legislation that would provide expanded funding for a range of mental health services for families, including but not limited to at risk families, unaccompanied youth and children in foster care placients, as well as persons of all ages with disabilities.

  • Advocate for health care coverage for those without homes and at risk of losing stable or permanent housing.

  • Advocate for an increase in mental health, substance abuse and alcohol abuse prevention and treatment programs.

  • Advocate for comprehensive supportive services that promote the strengthening of families.

  • Advocate that public funds be provided to finance not only iergency responses to homelessness, but also to implient preventative programs to reduce the incidence and prevalence of homeless persons and families.

  • Advocate for stricter regulations governing financial institutions, predatory lending, credit, and mortgage practices.

  • Dissiinate accurate information about homelessness to psychologists, policymakers, and the public to call attention to structural systiic issues that exacerbate homelessness. Suggest both psychological (e.g. clinical) and systiic structural interventions for those who suffer the consequences of poverty and homelessness.

References

Bosman, J. (2009, July 28). Homeless families could face eviction from shelters over rules. The New York Times.

Burt, M. R., Aron, L. Y., Douglas, T., Valente, J., Lee, E., & Iwen, B. (1999). Homelessness: Programs and the people they serve (summary report). Washington, DC: Urban Institute.

Burt, M.R., Pearson, C., & Montgomery, A.E. (2007). Community wide strategies for preventing homelessness. Journal of Primary Prevention, 28, 265-279.

Cochran, B. N., Stewart, A. J., Ginzler, J. A., & Cauce, A. M. (2002). Challenges faced by homeless sexual minorities: Comparison of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender homeless adolescents with their heterosexual counterparts. American Journal of Public Health, 92, 773- 777.

Donahue, P. J. & Tuber, S. B. (1995). The impact of homelessness on children's level of aspiration. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 59, 249-255.

Haber, M., & Toro, P. A. (2004). Homelessness among families, children and adolescents: An ecological-developmental perspective (PDF, 1.2MB). Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 7, 123- 164.

Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians' Network. (2000). Mental illness, chronic homelessness: An American disgrace (PDF, 135KB). Healing Hands, 4(5), 1-2. Retrieved from:

Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians' Network. (2003). Homelessness and family trauma: The case for early intervention (PDF, 288KB). Healing Hands, 7(2), 1-3. Retrieved from: ht

Krieger, J., & Higgins, D. L. (2002). Housing and health: Time again for public health action.American Journal of Public Health, 92, 758-768.

Kosa, F. (2009). The homiakers. Miller-McCune, March-April, 2009. Retrieved March 23, 2010

Lehman, A. F., & Cordray, D. S. (1993). Prevalence of alcohol, drug, and mental disorders among the homeless: One more time. Contiporary Drug Problis, 20, 355-383.

Manneh, S. (2008). In economic downshift, minorities risk losing most.

Morse, G. A., Calsyn, R. J., Miller, J., Rosenberg, P., West, L., & Gilliland, J. (1996). Outreach to homeless mentally ill people: Conceptual and clinical considerations. Community Mental Health Journal, 32, 261-274.

National Coalition for the Homeless (2009, July). Fact sheet: Who is homeless? (PDF, 112.8KB) Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved March 22, 2010

National Alliance to End Homelessness (2010, March). Chronic homelessness: Policy solutions. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved March 22, 2010.

National Alliance to End Homelessness (2009, Sept). Geography of homelessness, Part 3: Subpopulations by geographic type. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved March 22, 2010

Rafferty, Y., & Shinn, M. (1991). The impact of homelessness on children. American Psychologist, 46, 1170-1179.

Schnazer, B., Dominguez, B., Shrout, P. E., & Caton, C. L. (2007) Homelessness, health status and health care use. American Journal of Public Health, 97, 464-469.

Shinn, M. (1992). Homelessness: What is a psychologist to do? American Journal of Community Psychology, 20, 1-24.

Shinn, M. (2007). International homelessness: Policy, socio-cultural, and individual Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2003). Blueprint for change: Ending chronic homelessness for people with serious mental illnesses and co-occurring substance use disorders. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Toro, P.A., Dworsky, A., & Fowler, P.J. (2007). Homeless youth in the United States: Recent research findings and intervention approaches. In D. Dennis, G. Locke, & J. Khadduri (Eds.), Toward understanding homelessness: The 2007 National Symposium on Homelessness Research. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

U.S. Conference of Mayors (2008). Hunger and homelessness survey: A status report on hunger and homelessness in America's cities (PDF, 894KB). Washington, DC: Author.

U.S. Conference of Mayors (2009). Hunger and homelessness survey: A status report on hunger and homelessness in America's cities (PDF, 1.2MB). Washington, DC: Author.

U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (2008, March). Inventory of federal programs that may assist homeless families with children (PDF, 257KB). Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved March 23, 2010.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, (2008): The 2008 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (PDF, 3.6MB). Retrieved from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development website.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, (2008): The 2008 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (PDF, 3.6MB). Retrieved from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development website.

Zlotnick, C., & Zerger, S. (2008). Survey findings on characteristics and health status of clients treated by the federally funded (US) Health Care for the Homeless Program. Health and Social Care in the Community, 17, 18—26.

Zlotnick, C., Robertson, M. J., & Lahiff, M. (1999). Getting off the streets: Economic resources and residential exits from homelessness, Journal of Community Psychology, 27, 209-224.

B.(21) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the following motion:

The Council of Representatives (1) reaffirms APA's 2004 Resolution on Sexual Orientation and Marriage, (2) acknowledges with pride the eleven amicus briefs that APA has filed in numerous legal cases on marriage equality for same-sex couples in which the scientific research that supports APA's position has been presented to the courts, including the California Suprie Court in 2006, (3) directs staff to create and distribute information materials to publicize APA's history and position on marriage equality for same-sex couples and the science that supports that position, and (4) requests that the APA boards and committees consider an updated resolution on Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples based on the evolving research.

C.(22) The Board voted to recommend that Council receive the report Resilience and Recovery after War: Refugee Children and Families in the United States.

XIII. Ethnic Minority Affairs

A.(23) The Board voted to recommend that Council approve the following motion:

Council finds that the program of fully reimbursing ethnic minority mibers of Council for their attendance at the February and August Council meetings (first approved by Council in August 2001) has been helpful in increasing ethnic minority representation on Council and should be continued.

Since the inception of the reimbursient program for ethnic minority mibers, Council approved a policy that became effective in January 2006 to provide that all Council mibers be fully reimbursed for their attendance at the February meeting of Council and for the cost of two night's stay at the headquarters hotel where Council is housed for the convention meeting of Council.

APA strongly encourages Divisions and State, Provincial and Territorial Associations to submit one or more slates of nominees comprised solely of ethnic minorities. In order to continue to provide incentives for Divisions and State, Provincial and Territorial Associations to elect ethnic minorities to Council, APA shall provide full reimbursient (transportation, hotel and meal charges) for ethnic minority mibers of Council who are elected during the years 2011-2013 for their attendance at the convention meeting of Council.

For purposes of this program, ethnic minority identity is determined by self-identification as a miber of one of the following four U.S. ethnic minority groups: African American/Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian American/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic / Latino.

XIV. International Affairs

No itis.

XV. Central Office

No Itis.

XVI. Financial Affairs

A.(24) The Board voted to approve the following motion regarding 2011 Budget Planning:

Salaries: The Board encourages the Chief Executive Officer to make staff salary increases and retention very high priorities for the 2011 Budget in view of two consecutive years of no raises and a growing probli of staff retention in the DC market.

Discretionary Funds: Although much discussion surrounded the possibility of using the discretionary funds as a potential source to fund the strategic plan, the Board concluded with therecommendation that the 2011 discretionary funds should riain at zero.

Inflation: Based on managients' recommendation, the Board offered no comment on inflation factors because they felt it was priature.

B.(25) That Board voted to recommend that Council approve the following motion regarding 2011 Revenues:

Council approves the spring 2010 projections of $112 million for 2010 and $108 million for 2011, noting that the 2011 revenues will serve as the general framework for the 2011 Budget that will be developed during the fall of 2010 and presented to Council for approval in February of 2011.

On the recommendation of the Finance Committee and Board of Directors, and given that the CPI-U has been virtually flat, Council approves no increase to the APA miber dues for the 2011 dues year. Similarly, the other fees incriented to the CPI-U (including the student and teacher affiliate fees) will riain flat for 2011.

The Board also voted to 1) support managient's recommendation to continue with the budget process as impliented for the 2010 Budget; 2) direct the CFO to develop a 2011 interim expense budget to parallel the 2011 revenue budget that was approved by the Finance Committee and the Board in June. The interim expense budget will be prepared using year-to-date and prior year expenditures, as well as any other relevant information. All appropriate assumptions, estimates, and caveats will be presented in the accompanying notes to the interim expense budget.

C.(26) The Board voted to accept the following 2009 audit-related reports: APA Consolidated Financial Statients as of Deciber 31, 2009; Supplientary Financial Report (OMB Circular A-133) as of Deciber 31, 2009; APA 750 LLC Financial Statients as of Deciber 31, 2009 and APA Ten G LLC Financial Statient as of Deciber 31, 2009.

The Board voted to reappoint Argy, Wiltse & Robinson to perform the 2010 APA audit and tax work (conducted in 2011) contingent upon negotiation of acceptable engagient terms.

D.(27) The Board voted to recommend that Council reject the following motion:

The APA will conduct a greenhouse gas inventory that will specify, at least, the amount and sources of its iissions and ways to reduce its contribution to greenhouse gases. This report will be used by the CEO to set iission goals, put into place polices to reduce the organization's contribution to greenhouse gas iissions and monitor progress toward the goals. The goals will meet or exceed standards set by other similar businesses and organizations attipting to reduce greenhouse gas iissions. The annual report on environmental issues will be expanded to its progress toward meeting the goals set by the CEO. Either the CEO or the environmental committee will indicate whether it recommends follow up inventories in the future.

The Board did not dei the external CO2 impact study to be high enough in the strategic plan priority evaluation process to warrant funding.